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Product details

Mens watch
Solar drive
Waterproof up to 10 bar
Radio controlled
Sapphire glass
Date display
General
Specials: Glass back
Target group: Mens
Case
housing diameter: 42 mm
housing height: 10 mm
Shape: Round
Housing color: Silver
Glass: Sapphire
The most robust watch crystals are made out of sapphire glass. Only diamonds and carbide is harder and can scratch sapphire glass. Of course there are other materials such as some metals and stones which will scratch your sapphire glass crystal, so it is not wise to expect the watch to handle any abuse without getting marked. Sapphire has one downside though, it is highly reflective. Some watches receive an anti-glare coating to compensate for this, but sadly this coating is less hard and will scratch more easily.
glass
Material: Stainless steel
Dial
Display: Ana-digital
Dial color: Black
Digits: Arabic
Strap
Band colour: Black
Silver
Band material: Stainless steel
Ceramic
Clasp: Folding clasp
Technology
Drive: Solar
Radiocontrol
Radio controlled watches and clocks are timepieces that are able to receive a radio transmitted time signal and set themselves to it. They are what you and me can use to benefit from these incredibly exact atomic clocks out there. There are many different time signals, most countries have their own, so lets get technical: There is the MSF signal, also known as “Rugby Clock”, which broadcasts at a frequency of 60 kHz from the Anthorn radio station in Cumbria at a signal strength of 17 kW. The effective range is approx. 1000 km, so it will be received throughout the UK and western Europe. There are three atomic clocks on site, operated by the National Physical Laboratory. The information in the signal includes the UTC (former GMT) year, month, day of month, day of week, hour, minute, British Summer Time. The other commonly used radio time signal broadcast in Europe is the DCF77. This is broadcast from Mainflingen, near Frankfurt/Germany. So it is placed pretty centrally in Europe. It is transmitted at 77.5 kHz with a relatively high power of 50 kW, which means it has an effective range of 2000+ km. The signal contains pretty much the same information that the UK MSF signal does, but in UTC+1 (or CET). It is widely used in Europe because of its strength and centrally located broadcasting station. It is also quite popular in the UK, as almost all radio controlled watches can be set to a different time zone. This means they will still receive the DCF77 signal, but then add or subtract the amount of hours according to which time zone they have been set to.
There are multi-frequency watches available. These watches will be able to receive different time signals on different frequencies. Apart from the UK’s MSF and the European DCF77, the most common ones are the US WWVB (60 kHz) and the Japanese JJY (40 kHz and 60 kHz).
It is very important to know that the radio signal and the reception thereof is subject to various conditions. Apart from the fact that the signal does not mix that well with thick concrete and steel buildings, the time of day and the weather play a huge role. Rain will lower the range, but the signal will bounce off clouds, amplifying it a bit. The signal can travel further at nights and even the time of year and the position of the moon can have a slight impact. It has happened, that radio controlled clocks in eastern Canada set themselves regularly to the German DFC77 signal. It can also happen that you will have problems receiving the signal in the middle of England. Most commonly it is a too weak battery, but you could live in a valley or behind a mountain or just a massive building. If you are having problems receiving a radio signal, place it on the windowsill over night, preferably in the direction of the broadcasting station which signal you are trying to receive. If this does not work, turning the watch by 45° might do the trick. Sounds like a lot of witchcraft? Well, radio controlled watches are a lot more technical and tricky than normal ones. A perfect every-day reception is by no way guaranteed by the manufacturers. And it is not really required as the watches only use the signal to set their highly accurate quartz movements. Unless you calculate time in milliseconds, a couple of days without a signal will pass unnoticed.
led:
Radiocontrol
Radio controlled watches and clocks are timepieces that are able to receive a radio transmitted time signal and set themselves to it. They are what you and me can use to benefit from these incredibly exact atomic clocks out there. There are many different time signals, most countries have their own, so lets get technical: There is the MSF signal, also known as “Rugby Clock”, which broadcasts at a frequency of 60 kHz from the Anthorn radio station in Cumbria at a signal strength of 17 kW. The effective range is approx. 1000 km, so it will be received throughout the UK and western Europe. There are three atomic clocks on site, operated by the National Physical Laboratory. The information in the signal includes the UTC (former GMT) year, month, day of month, day of week, hour, minute, British Summer Time. The other commonly used radio time signal broadcast in Europe is the DCF77. This is broadcast from Mainflingen, near Frankfurt/Germany. So it is placed pretty centrally in Europe. It is transmitted at 77.5 kHz with a relatively high power of 50 kW, which means it has an effective range of 2000+ km. The signal contains pretty much the same information that the UK MSF signal does, but in UTC+1 (or CET). It is widely used in Europe because of its strength and centrally located broadcasting station. It is also quite popular in the UK, as almost all radio controlled watches can be set to a different time zone. This means they will still receive the DCF77 signal, but then add or subtract the amount of hours according to which time zone they have been set to.
There are multi-frequency watches available. These watches will be able to receive different time signals on different frequencies. Apart from the UK’s MSF and the European DCF77, the most common ones are the US WWVB (60 kHz) and the Japanese JJY (40 kHz and 60 kHz).
It is very important to know that the radio signal and the reception thereof is subject to various conditions. Apart from the fact that the signal does not mix that well with thick concrete and steel buildings, the time of day and the weather play a huge role. Rain will lower the range, but the signal will bounce off clouds, amplifying it a bit. The signal can travel further at nights and even the time of year and the position of the moon can have a slight impact. It has happened, that radio controlled clocks in eastern Canada set themselves regularly to the German DFC77 signal. It can also happen that you will have problems receiving the signal in the middle of England. Most commonly it is a too weak battery, but you could live in a valley or behind a mountain or just a massive building. If you are having problems receiving a radio signal, place it on the windowsill over night, preferably in the direction of the broadcasting station which signal you are trying to receive. If this does not work, turning the watch by 45° might do the trick. Sounds like a lot of witchcraft? Well, radio controlled watches are a lot more technical and tricky than normal ones. A perfect every-day reception is by no way guaranteed by the manufacturers. And it is not really required as the watches only use the signal to set their highly accurate quartz movements. Unless you calculate time in milliseconds, a couple of days without a signal will pass unnoticed.
led
Functions: Date display
Luminescent numeral
Waterproof
Water tightness or impermeability, surprisingly enough, is the degree to which you can expose your watch to the element water. A watch can be water repellent to a variety of degrees, from surviving the odd splash, to keeping the watch fully functioning long after your crushed body has hit the ocean floor. Please note that these are always theoretical values. Water behaves very differently at different temperatures and with varying salinity. So we took our crayons and made you this rough guide (which, by the way, is in no way legally binding and we will not be held accountable for your watch if you ruin it):

Waterproof

FYI: 10m is 1 bar is (roughly) 33 ft is (exactly) 0.986923267 atm
:
10 bar

Evaluation

4.7 of 5.0 (3)


13.03.2017
11:00

Sah auf den Fotos schon sehr gut aus, wirkt in natura noch besser. Meine ohnehin hohen Erwartungen wurden tatsächlich übertroffen. Klares Zifferblatt mit leichter Ablesbarkeit. Lünette trotz mattem Finish außerordentlich kratzfest (hat im Praxistest den Kontakt mit Reißverschluss und Drückknöpfen aus Metall schadlos überstanden).


21.12.2015
09:15

Great Watch. My second Junghans watch. Not common in Denmark. Only negative is that in dark conditions it can be difficult to read the time. This was better with my old Junghans. The date also require good light. The wristband is of very high quality. The technical part also works perfect and the sync happens every night. Power level is good, even in the dark time of year here in the northern part of Europe.

Michael Tolvard Pedersen (male, 47)

09.03.2015
17:55

Ich bin sehr großer Fan der Marke Junghans. Habe eigentlich mein ganzes Leben nur Junghans Uhren getragen. Ich mag daran besonders die deutsche Qualität. Made in Germany. Das ist schon echt was wert. Meine beiden bisherigen Junghans Uhren sind einmal komplett silber und einmal schwarz. Vom Design her bleibt sich Junghans ja eh selber treu. Von daher hatte ich mich schon gefragt, brauche ich überhaupt eine neue Uhr. Die beiden leisten treue Dienste und an sich ist kein Bedarf. Aber man möchte ja auch ab und zu etwas anderes tragen und so bin ich zu dieser Uhr gekommen.
Besonders gut hat mir die Kombination aus schwarz und silber gefallen. Ich habe mich irgendwie zugegebener Maßen in die Uhr verguckt. Sie hat es mir angetan.
Zu den inneren Werten muß man eigentlich nichts sagen, alles Junghans. Aber für die, die sich mit Junghans vielleicht noch nicht so auskennen sei gesagt: Die Uhr ist solarbetrieben. Das gesamte Zifferblatt fängt die Energie des Lichts ein und die Uhr speichert sie in einem Akku. Dadurch h

Richter (male, 64)
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